Rice University
Rice Magazine| The Magazine of Rice University | No. 3 | 2009
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The Countdown Begins

Lovett spent nine months on a fact-finding mission to 88 institutions of higher learning in 21 countries, which greatly informed his vision for Rice.

The  event is three years away, but Rice University is already deep into preparations for its 100th anniversary, which will include reflection on the achievements of its first century and anticipation for the century to come.

With the billion-dollar fundraising effort known as the Centennial Campaign up and running, Rice University officials are turning to a multiyear, campuswide commemoration culminating Oct. 12, 2012, the anniversary of the Rice Institute’s formal opening.

Three volunteer co-chairs have been chosen to lead the Centennial Commission: Rice trustee J.D. Bucky Allshouse ’71 and trustee emeriti Janice Cornell Doty ’60 and Teveia Rose Barnes ’75.
“We are so very pleased that Bucky, Janice and Teveia have agreed to serve in these leadership roles during this historic time for the university,” said Rice Board of Trustees Chairman Jim Crownover ’65. “They will provide important insight and great ideas for making the most of this once-in-a-century celebration.”

Allshouse is a Houston attorney and member of the Centennial Campaign cabinet who has been involved with the Rice community almost continuously since his graduation. A trustee since 1988, he also served as a board member and president of the Association of Rice Alumni and was president of the Owl Club from 1981 to 1983. Allshouse and his wife, Cynthia, helped drive the effort and raise the funds to support the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy and The Shepherd School of Music.

Doty, of Greenwich, Conn., was for many years an executive with IBM. She has broad experience in sales, marketing, product development, corporate communications, direct marketing and real estate management. She led the development of the IBM Gallery of Science and Art in New York City. When she became a Rice trustee in 1999, she was executive vice president of Harris McCully Associates, a career management consulting company in New York City. Doty also served on the executive committee of the Association of Rice Alumni board.

Barnes is a San Francisco attorney whose work in diversity programs is legendary. She founded Lawyers For One America to promote racial and ethnic diversity in the profession, has served as general counsel and executive director of the Bar Association of San Francisco and was associate general counsel and senior vice president of Bank of America. She joined the ranks of Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg when she was given the Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement Award by the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession in 2004. She is currently a partner in the law firm Foley & Lardner LLP and practices in the Finance and Financial Institutions and Bankruptcy and Business Reorganizations groups.

“Bucky, Janice and Teveia are dedicated alumni,” said President David Leebron. “I have no doubt that with their guidance we will commemorate this important milestone with as much distinction as did our founders at the university’s opening nearly a century ago.”

The responsibility of the commission chairs will be “to provide a public face for the centennial and to set strategic direction for the Centennial Commission — a soon-to-be-formed representative group of Rice’s many constituencies,” said Kathleen Boyd Fossi ’80, who serves as the director of the centennial effort. Committees were formed more than five years ago to start the planning process.
Boyd Fossi will be taking advantage of opportunities already in place to create a series of events leading to the official commemoration in October 2012. “Our plans are to leverage existing initiatives and events rather than create expensive new ones,” she said.

John Boles ’65, Rice’s William Pettus Hobby Professor of History, is helping to identify the historic milestones leading up to the centennial.

“The opening convocation in 1912 announced bold ambitions for the new university and carefully projected its ultimate place in the highest echelon of world universities,” he said. “The centennial commemoration will celebrate that trajectory and help set our sights even higher for the coming decades.”

Each year from now through 2012 will feature centennial events with an annual theme based on the university’s history or aspirations.

This year’s theme — “Engaging the World” — recognizes the 100th anniversary of founding president Edgar Odell Lovett’s trip around the globe. Lovett spent nine months on a fact-finding mission to 88 institutions of higher learning in 21 countries, which greatly informed his vision for Rice. This journey of academic exploration, Boles said, “convinced Lovett that the Rice Institute, from the very beginning, should aspire to be an international university” — a goal that is still central to Rice’s mission today.

Events during the year will highlight a number of the university’s Vision for the Second Century priorities that have international themes, among them global health, the Chao Center for Asian Studies and the Latin American Initiative.

Boyd Fossi has extensive experience to prepare her for the work ahead. She spent 16 years with Continental Airlines, where she was responsible for product development and branding and led the creation of its blue-and-gold identity and “BusinessFirst” international service. Boyd Fossi also spent 12 years as a consultant to airlines and airports worldwide.

“We will seek involvement campuswide — the departments, centers, institutes and colleges as well as alumni, friends and community members — to make sure we cover all of the bases in the centennial commemoration,” she said. “This is about and for all of the Rice community.”