Rice University
Rice Magazine| The Magazine of Rice University | No. 3 | 2009

Through the Sallyport:

Halas
Move Over Bono — Naomi’s Here
By
Naomi Halas recently found herself searching Wikipedia to learn about Thomas Pynchon and delighting in the possibility that, somewhere out there, Bono was Googling her.
Global Warming
$15 Million Gift to Redesign Engineering Education
By
Two Rice University alumni with engineering degrees — he a famed venture capitalist, she an environmental activist — have given their alma mater $15 million to transform the way engineers are educated.
Wii

Collecting Data Is a Wii Bit of Fun
By

Why are some people fast learners? Can we teach everybody to be like them? Yes, Wii can. Rice professors Marcia O’Malley and Michael Byrne are making use of Nintendo’s popular Wii video game technology to codify learning systems in ways that can be used in a range of human endeavors, from sports to surgery.

Virus shot

Viral Mug Shot

By

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Rice University’s precise new image of a virus’s protective coat is seriously undervalued.

Career Center

Not Your Parents’ Career Services Center
By
If Rice’s Career Services Center was the chrysalis, then the butterfly is the Center for Student Professional Development (CSPD), a dynamic and interactive learning center designed to enhance Rice students’ knowledge and skills for long-term professional advancement


Researchers
Batteries Get a Boost
By
Need to store electricity more efficiently? Put it behind bars. That’s essentially the finding of a team of Rice University researchers who have created hybrid carbon-nanotube/metal-oxide arrays as electrode material that may improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries.
Tour
Science Rocks at Rice
By
The much-honored Rice University professor and a team of students have been working away on a set of songs for the popular video game that mixes a little science with a lot of shred. And for those who’d rather move their feet than their fingers, well, Tour’s got something for them, too.
Sweat
It's enough to make you sweat
By
Scientists have long known that animals use scent to communicate. But how much does the human sense of smell complement the more powerful senses of sight and hearing?
Rats
Ratting Out Disease
By
A research project at Rice has brought scientists to the brink of comprehending a long-standing medical mystery that may link cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and perhaps even Alzheimer’s disease. And for that, we can thank the rat.
Forgetting
What Is That Word ... ?
By
Most of us forgive ourselves the occasional forgetfulness, but for stroke patients suffering from aphasia, the inability to find the right word can be frequent and profound. Tatiana Schnur wants to know why.
Elderly
Healing vs. Quality of Life

Healing an elderly patient’s physical problems does not automatically improve the patient’s quality of life.
Trustees
Barry, Deal Booth Elected Rice Trustees
By
Rice University alumnae Subha Viswanathan Barry and Suzanne Deal Booth have been elected to the Rice Board of Trustees.
Application Boom

Word is spreading that Rice University is on the move.

Business Plan Competition Offers a Wealth of Opportunity


The Rice Business Plan Competition saw a 45 percent increase in entries for this year’s event.

Wireless at WARP Speed


Nothing kills innovation like having to reinvent the wheel.

Rice Ranks Third in Nanotoxicology Publications

A new study finds that Rice ranks third globally in publications in the field of nanotoxicology.

Journal Takes Top Honors


One of the world’s leading interdisciplinary journals on Asia, Rice University-based positions: east asia cultures critique, was unanimously selected as the winner of the 2008 Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) award for Best Special Issue for “War Capital Trauma.”

Let Your Mind Fly
It was no mere flight of fancy.
BRC à la Cart
BioScience Research Collaborative (BRC) begins blazing new biomedical trails in July.
Owlets
Ryan Moore, manager of networking for Network Management, put his ingenuity to work
An Advanced Degree of Living
A look at the new graduate apartments.